Bri Arden

LION'S HEART

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Movie night… QUALITY WRITING!

"Jefe: Machado would have traded every word, every poem, every verse he ever wrote for one more hour with his beloved. And that is because when it comes to grief, the normal rules of exchange do not apply, because grief transcends value. A man would give entire nations to lift grief off his heart. And yet, you cannot buy anything with grief, because grief is worthless.

Counselor: Why are you telling me this?

Jefe: Because you continue to deny the reality of the world you’re in. Do you love your wife so much, so completely, that you would exchange places with her upon the wheel? And I don’t mean dying, because dying is easy.

Counselor: Yes! Yes, damn you!

Jefe: Well, that is good to hear, Counselor.

Counselor: What are you saying? Are you saying this is a possibility?

Jefe: No. It’s impossible.

Counselor: You said I was that man - at that crossing.

Jefe: Yes. At the understanding that life is not going to take you back. You are the world you have created. And when you cease to exist, this world that you have created will also cease to exist. But for those with the understanding that they’re living the last days of the world, death acquires a different meaning. The extinction of all reality is a concept no resignation can encompass. And then, all the grand designs and all the grand plans will be finally exposed and revealed for what they are. And now, Counselor, I have to go, because I have to make other calls. If I have time, I think I’ll take a small nap.”

~The Counselor

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Just a little baby talk…

1) To everyone pregnant or with newbornns. I AM JEALOUS AND HAVE BEEN SINCE I HIT PUBERTY… “JOY TO THE WORLD!” Literally. I melt with every baby carriage I pass walking down the street. Your baby is absolutely BEAUTIFUL and I just want to steal it for 5 seconds and kiss and hug it! Not possible? Ok, deal will the “OMG how cute!” stare from the late 20-something-year-olds. 
2) I don’t want your kid. I want mine. Yes, that may take 5-15 years but i’m totally cool where I am. However, on occasion, when I see a very young child, I spaz. Can you deal with that?
3) I will babysit. I will treat your child like its my own. Till my boyfriend gets me a dog. Then all bets are off….

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From my psychologist… I mean my Abnormal Psychology Professor. Is there a difference?

"Some advice as you prep for your exam…First, take deep breaths. This is only an exam and by now you’ve taken dozens of them, practice cognitive restructuring to decrease the probability of anxiety. Second, procrastination within the context of this unit represents behavioral avoidance, remember the way out of anxiety is to move toward it, structure your study time wisely. Third, indulge in some self-care this weekend, but beware of the dominating Id which would interfere with your efforts to limit avoidance :). Finally, know that you will be able to handle the outcome (your grade) no matter what it may be."

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I visited the MOMA yesterday with a friend. We entered an exhibit called Play Dead; Real Time, by Douglas Gordon. He arranged for an elephant to be transported to a gallery in New York City; then, he filmed it obeying a series of commands. Two movie-sized screens showed the elephant repeatedly lying down, standing up, etc… People could walk behind the screen, becoming a moving shadow and a part of the image viewed on the other side of the screen. My friend snapped a few pictures and only on returning home did I examine the images he captured. 
Gordon wanted to convey that the elephant, as are so many others, is subject to overarching forces beyond its control.
I chose my actions, but when I looked at the photograph that had been taken of me and the other people in the image, who all happened to be women, I realized that we were a part of Gordon’s work. 
Who were the women in the photograph? One woman (considered large in today’s society) with her child, two women appearing as if they were about to kiss (but perhaps not), one posing for a photograph, and me, reaching to touch to nose of the image of an elephant. I realized that though there was a giant elephant above our heads, it was not the only elephant in the room. This photograph became a piece of art for discourse, for the female and male gaze. The “elephant in the room” was not solely the image of an elephant compelled by millennia of evolution and its current circumstance to obey the commands of its master; it included the women who happened to be behind the screen who too were subject to forces eons in the making and affected by current circumstance. 
Gordon had successfully conveyed his message; that sometimes we are subject to greater forces beyond our control. Whether we are all just players on a stage with our parts already written or in command of our every action is posed. Our personal interpretations will vary, but each will almost certainly contain some element of bittersweet irony.

I visited the MOMA yesterday with a friend. We entered an exhibit called Play Dead; Real Time, by Douglas Gordon. He arranged for an elephant to be transported to a gallery in New York City; then, he filmed it obeying a series of commands. Two movie-sized screens showed the elephant repeatedly lying down, standing up, etc… People could walk behind the screen, becoming a moving shadow and a part of the image viewed on the other side of the screen. My friend snapped a few pictures and only on returning home did I examine the images he captured. 

Gordon wanted to convey that the elephant, as are so many others, is subject to overarching forces beyond its control.

I chose my actions, but when I looked at the photograph that had been taken of me and the other people in the image, who all happened to be women, I realized that we were a part of Gordon’s work. 

Who were the women in the photograph? One woman (considered large in today’s society) with her child, two women appearing as if they were about to kiss (but perhaps not), one posing for a photograph, and me, reaching to touch to nose of the image of an elephant. I realized that though there was a giant elephant above our heads, it was not the only elephant in the room. This photograph became a piece of art for discourse, for the female and male gaze. The “elephant in the room” was not solely the image of an elephant compelled by millennia of evolution and its current circumstance to obey the commands of its master; it included the women who happened to be behind the screen who too were subject to forces eons in the making and affected by current circumstance. 

Gordon had successfully conveyed his message; that sometimes we are subject to greater forces beyond our control. Whether we are all just players on a stage with our parts already written or in command of our every action is posed. Our personal interpretations will vary, but each will almost certainly contain some element of bittersweet irony.